Sharing the Load Eases Stress, Says Researchers

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New research from Queen’s University, Canada has demonstrated that strong relationships between two people can help ease stress when individuals are faced with difficult situations. The researchers used adolescent young women in stressful situations who were physically close to their mothers.

Prior to the situational stress, they were asked to rate their emotional closeness with their mothers. During the situation they either held their mother’s hand or didn’t. The researchers found that those adolescent girls who were physically close to their mother and held their hands, were able to handle the stress more effectively, as evaluated by sensors placed on their skin measuring levels of perspiration.

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Colon Screening Blood Test Improves Results


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Thanks to screening tests like the colonoscopy, most colon cancers are detected in the early stages. However, the colonoscopy involves snaking a camera through the intestines to identify polyps and remove them before they become cancerous. The new blood test requires additional testing to demonstrate the effectiveness of the test.

Because the colonoscopy can be expensive, is invasive and usually unpleasant, researchers have been trying to look for less invasive methods that would encourage more people to be tested for colon cancer.  

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Do you Address, Maintain or Adapt

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In most relationships there are common threads in disagreements and arguments – and the finances ranks in the top 5 of those common issues.  New research now demonstrates techniques that couple can use to reduce their conflicts while addressing financial uncertainty.

Regardless of income level, all couples face times of financial uncertainty. Whether they are deciding how to get food to the table for their family or whether or not to sell their vacation home, there are times in every couple’s relationship when finances become topic of conversation and the outcome is not certain.

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Two thirds of Alzheimer’s Cases Triggered by Potentially Modifiable Factors

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In the latter part of August 2015, researchers published their findings in the British Medical Journal which found that there are nine risk factors for Alzheimer’s disease – all of which are potentially modifiable. In other words, we have more control over our elder years than we may have anticipated.

In a literature review of studies done in the past the researchers identified 323 studies, covering 93 different risk factors and including more than 5000 people.  From this group they found that nine risk factors appeared to account for 2/3 of the diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease across the world.

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Getting Passionate about Work

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In a study released in August 2015, researchers found that contrary to popular opinion, love at first site is not necessary with a potential job. The research was done at the University of Michigan and they suggest that you can choose to change your beliefs or strategies to cultivate passion for your new job or develop better compatibility with the job you already have.

 

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Laughter Indicates Attraction

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In a study released from the University of Kansas, researchers inadvertently found a link between laughter and humor and romantic attraction. While looking for a link between humor and intelligence, researchers found that men who attempted to be funny with a woman was signaling his attraction, and women who appreciated his attempt at humor was signaling her attraction.

The researchers went on to share that while humor is cited as one of the most valued traits in a partner, finding someone who appreciates your sense of humor is valuable in its own right. The lead researcher describes three previous studies in which they were attempting to equate humor with intelligence, and in all three instances failed to make the connection.

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Simple Changes Can Improve Health Maintenance

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In a study released August 2015 by the Kessler Foundation, researchers found that the primary limiting factor for individuals who suffer from Multiple Sclerosis was their processing speed.

In other words, implementing strategies which could improve processing speed in the brain could help individuals with MS to maintain their daily activities and stay gainfully employed.

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Money Talks

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About a year ago The New Yorker carried an in depth article about the language of money. As the author succinctly pointed out, “It is potent and efficient, but also exclusive and excluding. Explanations are hard to hold on to, because an entire series of them may be compressed into a phrase, or even a single word.”

However, while sometimes overwhelming and often confusing, it is not a reason for you to abdicate your role as King or Queen of your kingdom. Your kingdom runs on money – as does everyone else’s. And, unless you understand and control the money, you’ll eventually lose your kingdom.

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Diabetes and Bone Loss

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In 2014 there were approximately 30 million people in the United States who had diabetes. This is 9.3% of the population. However, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention also estimate that there are another 8 million people who are not diagnosed with diabetes.

This is an amazing number of people who suffer from a metabolic condition that has far reaching effects on your health and wellness. And more recently, researchers from the University of Delaware found a startling elevation in the risk of bone fracture in patients with diabetes. Bone fractures can be life-threatening. They result in death from one in every six hip fractures within a year of the injury.

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Acupuncture and High Blood Pressure

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Individuals with high blood pressure find that they experience a drop in their blood pressure that can last up to a month and a half when they practice acupuncture. This groundbreaking research was the result of over a decade of information and reported by the Susan Samueli Center for Integrative Medicine.

This is the first study that has scientifically confirmed acupuncture has some benefit in treating mild to moderate hypertension. Regular use can help you control blood pressure and lessen the risk of stroke and heart disease.

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